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I Couldn't Come Up With A Clever Title, So I'll Break The 4th Wall and Say I'm Talking About Servers

Discussion in 'Nerd Out Zone' started by Gingy, Sep 1, 2015.

  1. Gingy

    Gingy Back Into Space

    • Member
    Long story short, I got a shitty computer as a gift. Instead of trashing it, I decided to see if it was worth selling, and was told it wasn't worth it, but was also suggested to turn it into a server. Evidently, I could (probably) upgrade it to a small gaming server for ~$110. I'm still bummed by the fact that I have to hold on to this piece of shit when I had literally just finished building a PC and one of my main reasons for building one was consolidation so I didn't have to hold onto so many pieces of shit, but after forethought, it could be fairly useful.

    Sadly, I'm becoming closer and closer to not being able to bother with the bullshit associated with joining random servers for multiplayer games. Since my upload speeds are decent, and my ping is amazing, (my average is probably 20-40ms) I thought I would try out running my own damned gaming servers with blackjack and hookers after I get the parts. It's definitely going to be a small server, since the upgrades will consist of an LGA1150 motherboard, a Celeron processor, and 4GB of RAM. Supposedly, that's enough for several games I play regularly to host a server with a maximum of 20-30 players.

    Since I'm new to this, I'm partially making this post to ask if anyone who has experience with this has any tips for how to make this run a little more smoothly. I'm also wondering if anyone here in the community would be willing to try this out when I get it running.
    Snipecoolbunny and joppiesaus like this.
  2. Arctic

    Arctic Giant Robot Advocate

    • Tester
    Damn, Celeron CPU? I had an old computer I would run Minecraft servers on. Pentium D, 3 GB DDR2 RAM, and wew lad did it absolutely suck.

    If you can upgrade a few parts to build it into a server, go ahead, but I wouldn't recommend spending too much effort on it.
  3. Arpak

    Arpak Moderator - Former CM

    • Moderator
    My 2 cents are

    1) Set it up to never turn itself off, hibernation and the like, it gets really annoying
    2) Get a remote access program so you don't need to give up a monitor, keyboard, and mouse to control it, I suggest TightVNC.
    Snipecoolbunny and Gingy like this.
  4. Gingy

    Gingy Back Into Space

    • Member
    How many people would you usually have on your server though?
  5. Arpak

    Arpak Moderator - Former CM

    • Moderator
    I have a server PC that actual is under my bed (mmm keeps my pillow all warm for me) and its running and i3-2xxx and 8GB RAM and it can easily run most server applications these days, the real bottleneck will always be the internet speed, particularly upload. Mine recently was upped to 5Mbps and it allows it to run alright for atleast 5 people, dunno about more though.
  6. Arctic

    Arctic Giant Robot Advocate

    • Tester
    ONE.
  7. Snipecoolbunny

    Snipecoolbunny Back Into Space

    • Member
    thats alot of shit...
    well anyway, it seems good for just a few people on your server at a time. my friend had a LAPTOP run his server AND play on the laptop AND record HD video all at 20 fps(minecraft server). and i had no lag while on his server. so that comp should run great for a server of about 10-15 people at a time. if your running resource intensive games like planetside 2 or Call of Duty, i dont recommend having any server. but simple games like minecraft should do well. and if you have a quad core processor, it should play at a decent fps. but of course your not playing on it so it doesnt matter. just more resources for the server.

    but all in all, it should run for at least 10 people well in non-CPU-heavy games.
  8. Snipecoolbunny

    Snipecoolbunny Back Into Space

    • Member
    depends on what your doing. and how many friends you have. if your like me, i have no friends so i dont need a server! but if you want one, 20 people should do it if your not running anything else and have the priority set to high.
  9. Gingy

    Gingy Back Into Space

    • Member
    Well, my hard limit of how many people I could hold on a server is 20. Even if I had much better specs, I don't trust it on my 12mbps upload speeds to hold more than that. It's mostly going to be for when I have a bunch of friends together for stuff anyway. Aside from maybe an IRC bot and a Teamspeak server, nothing will be running 24/7. From what Arpak said, I might be able to pull it off. I would think a 4th generation Celeron would at least have similar performance to a 2nd genderation i3.
    Snipecoolbunny likes this.
  10. zeroinnocent

    zeroinnocent Tester

    • Tester
    use it instead as a small bitcoin farm
  11. Arpak

    Arpak Moderator - Former CM

    • Moderator
    You are correct, they perform almost exactly the same :)
  12. PsychoticLeprechaun

    PsychoticLeprechaun Designer & Web Developer

    • Dev Member
    I ran a server on my computer for a while (specs were i5-2500k, 8GB RAM, GTX 560Ti), multiple servers over time actually, but the largest pop server I had was 10-ish and my upload was 5Mbps. I was running an FTB server at that point (one of the larger packs in that series) and had basically no issues.

    If you're running vanilla Minecraft with Bukkit + plug-ins (not sure what has replaced Bukkit since the team fell out with Mojang) then I would be surprised if those specs with 12Mbps upload couldn't hit 30 users. I mean, even that allows 20Kb per tick per player for 30 players, which seems ample bandwidth to me (this is assuming you minimise processes on the server computer as much as possible, which is entirely feasible).

    On the note of minimising processes, I recommend installing Linux on your server computer and using an article like this if you are unsure how to install MC on Linux. You can make Ubuntu incredibly lightweight, plus it is really easy to deal with things like MySQL servers on Linux so if you have plug-ins that need MySQL databasing, you have that side of things easier for you too.
  13. Gingy

    Gingy Back Into Space

    • Member
    It's funny you say that, because my OS of choice is a pretty lightweight (system requirements are 256MB of RAM and a 233mhz processor) OS heavily based off Ubuntu.

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