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Linux development.

Discussion in 'Nerd Out Zone' started by TYHENDER, Aug 21, 2016.

  1. TYHENDER

    TYHENDER Industrial Re-revolutionist

    Soooooooooo
    Right now i'm trying to totally move to Linux(i'm dual-booting right now).And one of the things tha bug me is that i'm too dependent to Windows. I can't simply do a Linux port of any of my game engines.(Good i never used DirectX).I watched some of Ben's tutorials,but maaan it is so boring to learn everything from scratch((((And i think Ben's code is still dependent on Windows). But good i'm progressing in this.
    The next thing is a Linux IDE. People on stackoverflow say to do everything from scratch,but i don't feel this is right,i don't want to rewrite Linux kernel to use it -.-. I'm using Anjuta right now,but if someone know better IDE for an Old Windows user,please help me.

    So if anyone haves bad time with Linux,or is a fellow Linux developer,can help me and a lot of other people moving to Linux.(I'm with Windows till 2020,then kcuF YOU microsoft!)
    TYHENDER, Aug 21, 2016
    Last edited by TYHENDER; at Aug 21, 2016
    #1
  2. PsychoticLeprechaun

    PsychoticLeprechaun Designer & Web Developer

    • Dev Member
    Depends on needs, but Code::Blocks is under more active development than Anjuta. An alternative would be to use a simple text editor, gcc and gdb though given my own dependence on VS/NetBeans I can see why this option seems like a sucky direction to take.
  3. TYHENDER

    TYHENDER Industrial Re-revolutionist

    Well , ithink i'll use Code::Blocks then, 'cause even that i know how to use Premake,i don't like to use it,so i want an IDE to make this for me.
  4. joppiesaus

    joppiesaus Infamous Space-Octopus

    • Member
    I don't know Visual Studio Code, but what I heard from it it's pretty good.

    I've never done any major C++ programming on Linux, but I'm using Geany for my small C programs at the moment. Great IDE if you're running a potato.

    I think I'm going to learn "make", and also try to port my "Zombie Game" I made a while back using the C++ tutorials Ben made. Maybe I'm even going to try to improve it and make the frames time-based!
    PsychoticLeprechaun likes this.
  5. PsychoticLeprechaun

    PsychoticLeprechaun Designer & Web Developer

    • Dev Member
    I forgot about Visual Studio Code. I installed that on my laptop a while back. It seems really good; VS Pro is more full-fledged but Code does pretty much everything critical and a fair few nice things that Pro does. Definitely recommend checking it out, though in its current state it requires more work to configure a project - I imagine once you have it all set up it makes for a great IDE though.
  6. TYHENDER

    TYHENDER Industrial Re-revolutionist

    Hey,Matt. Will my GL(exclusively GL,no Windows dependencies) run on VS Code? Cuz it can't on Code""Blocks and Anjuta(WEll,they both use GCC) with a lot of errors. So i hope i won't change my code much with Code.
  7. PsychoticLeprechaun

    PsychoticLeprechaun Designer & Web Developer

    • Dev Member
    If you're using exclusively OpenGL library functions, then yeah - as long as you set up your project's compiler options appropriately.
  8. TYHENDER

    TYHENDER Industrial Re-revolutionist

    That's good,but how about SDL(I'm using SDL for not so much time,but it is actually easier to use SDL/openGL that openGL only)?
  9. PsychoticLeprechaun

    PsychoticLeprechaun Designer & Web Developer

    • Dev Member
    SDL is also cross-platform, so I don't see why not!
  10. TYHENDER

    TYHENDER Industrial Re-revolutionist

    Cool.But i get many errors in Code::Blocks.(And even some non-sense like std::string is not defined,when string is included and compiler does not save there's no such file)
  11. PsychoticLeprechaun

    PsychoticLeprechaun Designer & Web Developer

    • Dev Member
    Is your code on a repo anywhere? Could have a look to see if it's anything obvious. Code::Blocks has worked fine for me every time I've used it.
  12. TYHENDER

    TYHENDER Industrial Re-revolutionist

    Without changing any code?
    Well,ok,i'll send my code(One from Ben's tutorials,it your engine,right?)
    EDIT:
    +-
    By ghostbin,not repository.
    EDIT:
    Maan,i did not know code is actually so large XD. Going to actually use a repo.
    TYHENDER, Aug 29, 2016
    Last edited by TYHENDER; at Aug 29, 2016
    #12
  13. TYHENDER

    TYHENDER Industrial Re-revolutionist

  14. PsychoticLeprechaun

    PsychoticLeprechaun Designer & Web Developer

    • Dev Member
    What is the precise error log on compilation?

    My initial thought is that it could be to do with the fact that the two IDEs may be using different compilers, or different versions of the same one. Especially given you say no code has changed.

    I remember when I last used Code::Blocks I had to go to the compiler settings and make sure the compiler was set to follow the C++11 standard. Though this being a fix for your issue is a stab in the dark. This link describes how to do that.
    PsychoticLeprechaun, Aug 29, 2016
    Last edited by PsychoticLeprechaun; at Aug 29, 2016
    #14
  15. PsychoticLeprechaun

    PsychoticLeprechaun Designer & Web Developer

    • Dev Member
    Another thing I wanted to add: you don't seem to be fond of version control. If there's one thing I can highly highly highly recommend in development it is version control. It is so darn useful.

    The basic thing is you need not worry about losing work, if you commit work to a remote repository regularly then any problems you encounter locally be it hardware failure or otherwise don't affect your code.

    Further, you can have a really good idea of what areas of code you are working on as you can separate out work into "branches". This also lends itself hugely to collaborative work. (I know this doesn't sound like a big issue, but my attention span tends towards me ending up working on various aspects of a program at once, and making that work discrete, with each aspect being worked on in an isolated version of the code makes it easier on my brain.)

    Plenty of other reasons to use it, but the reason that got me on board to start with was a simple one: I could replace my USB sticks (which invariably got lost) with a terminal and in a command or two review code I had written and get it online so my other devices could get hold of it instantly.
    PsychoticLeprechaun, Aug 29, 2016
    Last edited by PsychoticLeprechaun; at Aug 29, 2016
    #15
    joppiesaus likes this.
  16. TYHENDER

    TYHENDER Industrial Re-revolutionist

    I use git,but i like managerss more than console commands =D.
    Oh and yeah,USB is still better sometimes: for example when i need a liveUSB,or give some files to my friend that has no idea what is GNU/Linux(Most of them don't).
    OHHHH,and yeah i don't use C++11(There's no useful improvements,except nullptr(but i found an alternative for this),so i still uswe old standards.)
    For me,Visual Studio 2010 was last good Visual Studio(WTF?Visual Studio 2012 has more system requirements than GTA 5).
    And i already fixed error ;)(I did not link libraries). My GL projects were ported even more easily. I just forgot to delete <windows>(that i didn't used at all) in main.cpp
    PsychoticLeprechaun likes this.
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