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New Rig

Discussion in 'General Gaming' started by PsychoticLeprechaun, Sep 19, 2015.

  1. PsychoticLeprechaun

    PsychoticLeprechaun Designer & Web Developer

    • Dev Member
    So, I finally got round to updating my rig. My original set-up was pretty decent, and to be honest the CPU is solid even in 2015, but the graphics card wasn't up to the challenge of new games. I have shifted from just playing games to development, so I needed something a bit beefier on the productivity side too.

    I donated my old rig to my family (who actually had no functioning computer), got them hooked on Ubuntu and Libre Office (screw shelling out £200 for Microsoft Windows and Office) and have moved on to newer pastures for my own gaming and development needs.

    I hear you all crying "shut up blabbering and give specs", or maybe I don't and I'm just too excited to show off the rig that I want to hear that. Nonetheless I will heed that request and link you to the spec list on PCPartPicker.

    I'm really excited to try out this new rig. My plan is to go the Linux route with it, so it will have Ubuntu 14.04.3 to start with (nothing so far in 15.04 or 15.10 inspire me to go for them except the newer kernel, but 14.04 got 3.19 passed back to it in the LTS enablement stack, sooo may as well go for stable, and up-to-date where I need it).

    However I am considering putting a vanilla Linux kernel on it, as having 4.2, perhaps 4.3 by the time the rig is ready, will let me do something I want to do more easily with my new rig. I want to see if I can create a VM with Windows on it (not decided which Windows to go for yet, but I have a Win7 disk somewhere, so might just stick to that) and see about finnicking with it to let me pass certain hardware directly into it (i.e. have a VM with a 100% performing GPU). It may not work, but damned if I won't try - I want my 970 to let me play Skyrim, and soon Fallout 4 at the best it can!

    The rig is set up! The pictures of the rig, if people want to check them out, are here. My overall set-up; here.
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2015
    PsychoticLeprechaun, Sep 19, 2015
    Last edited by PsychoticLeprechaun; at Oct 3, 2015
    #1
  2. Gingy

    Gingy Back Into Space

    • Member
    I like. :3

    It's also nice to see another Linux user (since I'm horrible about keeping up with the community and have no idea who all on here does and doesn't use Linux yet). Please let me know if you get your virtual machine idea to work, because it's such an amazing idea that I may or may not want to try it

    As for the specs themselves, I obviously don't have any complaints. I'm just curious about some of the choices, such as the 6th gen i7 and 8GB of RAM.
    ColdFuseon likes this.
  3. joppiesaus

    joppiesaus Infamous Space-Octopus

    • Member
    Nice build.
    I see that 8 GB RAM is still very common. That was two-three years ago the same case. MOORE STEP IT UP PLEASE.
    Though I have 16 GB RAM which I purchased mid 2013. I had an awesome CPU(I think I'll be rocking my 3570k a long time), and a horrible GPU(it was old and cheap the time I bought it). Knowledge is everything!
    I doubt that the CPU world is going to make amazing improvements the couple of years. I doubt if the software is becoming more CPU intensive, either.

    I also note that there are quite a few GNU/Linux users out here. I use it too, I love it. I don't use it always because of the support and that I grew up with Windows. I still don't know how to call it, Linux or GNU/Linux.

    Oh and don't forget to install Tux Racer on your new Rig. It's really fun, especially when bored.
    ColdFuseon likes this.
  4. PsychoticLeprechaun

    PsychoticLeprechaun Designer & Web Developer

    • Dev Member
    Linux does the job for name - easier to type!

    The 8GB choice was for a very good reason: 16GB has little to no performance impacts in daily use, and I have yet to max 8GB in hard usage. That on top of the fact a dual channel 16GB solution is exactly twice the price of a dual channel 8GB solution for DDR4 means that for the sake of not going overboard on price, it was worth just going for 8GB.
    ColdFuseon and joppiesaus like this.
  5. PsychoticLeprechaun

    PsychoticLeprechaun Designer & Web Developer

    • Dev Member
    I'll be sure to give some updates as I try it out! I have a decent feeling about it, but there will be some difficulties as NVidia has a tendency to muck up when it comes to VMs.
    ColdFuseon likes this.
  6. Sevio

    Sevio Back Into Space

    • Member
    I've been running my setup with the OSes the other way around for years: Currently running Windows 10 as the main OS with a VMWare Player virtual machine running Gentoo Linux. I would like to be running Linux as the host OS, but as far as I've been able to figure out in the past, getting full 3d acceleration for a virtual machine guest is not a thing unless you do some complicated pure hardware pass-through using the Xen hypervisor, which leaves the host without a graphics card to render on. It could render on a second graphics chipset, like the integrated one that most intel CPUs have these days, but it would be a hard divide between two monitors.

    Ultimately access to the widest possible spectrum of games without fuss is a bit more important to me, so I settled for windows as the host OS. I'd be interested to hear about it if there has been any development on this front on the driver and virtual machine side of things though. :)

    As for RAM and playing games, there are so far only two things I know of that will push RAM usage beyond 6 GB (taking 2 GB into account for my linux virtual machine) and slow my computer down to a crawl:
    1. A future heavily modded Kerbal Space Program installation (currently only possible on linux but soon with the upcoming 1.1 update, on windows as well)
    2. ARK: Survival Evolved + ARK Dedicated server + 2 GB linux Virtual Machine - I've had to get my co-op friends to run dedicated servers for us instead as they have 8 GB as well but not a 2GB virtual machine. :p
  7. joppiesaus

    joppiesaus Infamous Space-Octopus

    • Member
    Have you considered dual-boot? It's my solution to everything!
  8. Snipecoolbunny

    Snipecoolbunny Back Into Space

    • Member
    that hard drive could be better. i'd recommend a WD raptor drive. its very fast and will speed up your comp by a bit. that drive could be used as secondary storage or as a backup drive. dont go for an SSD, as they leak info and can go corrupt. its just simply the way they are made, there are no ifs buts or ands about it. they are not reliable and have a short average lifespan. go for a raptor drive, you wouldnt regret it. i havent and ive had mine for over 2.5 years.

    i believe this is the one.
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...343&cm_re=raptor_drive-_-22-236-244-_-Product
  9. Snipecoolbunny

    Snipecoolbunny Back Into Space

    • Member
    and btw. i know its a bit pricey! go for it when you have more money.
  10. joppiesaus

    joppiesaus Infamous Space-Octopus

    • Member
    Whoa that raptor drive seems awesome! A little pricey though. 300 USD for 1 TB of spinning awesomeness.
    What do you mean with "They leak info"
    HDD's can go corrupt either. In fact, they die a lot quicker then SSD's. The benefit of HDD's is that you can notice it just before they die, that's not the case with SSD's.
    SSD's are a lot faster, use less power, and are more shock-resistant. The only disadvantage of it is that they carry less capacity, and that if they die, they die suddenly(except the case when they are just worn out due to writes. That happens linear exponentially).
    joppiesaus, Sep 21, 2015
    Last edited by joppiesaus; at Sep 21, 2015
    #10
    Snipecoolbunny likes this.
  11. PsychoticLeprechaun

    PsychoticLeprechaun Designer & Web Developer

    • Dev Member
    SSD's are fine on surge protected hardware. I have surge protection both at the plug socket and motherboard levels which means that most of my hardware is well protected across the board. SSD's are way faster than any HDD solution and my plan is for the 2TB HDD to be a data storage device, with my programs on the 256GB along with the game(s) I'm playing at the time (I have enough internet bandwidth to reinstall games whenever I choose to play a new one). My thought though is to perhaps go for RAID stripe with a second SSD in the future, and/or get a 1TB 7200RPM system drive for programs that I don't need on the SSD.
    Snipecoolbunny likes this.
  12. PsychoticLeprechaun

    PsychoticLeprechaun Designer & Web Developer

    • Dev Member
    You are very right; the hardware pass through has the limitation of the GPU being either available to the VM or host OS, but my uses for the OS are almost entirely suitably powered by modern Intel iGPUs (running IDEs, command prompts and maybe a YouTube video or two isn't insanely stressful).

    I'll definitely make a post reporting my success and what I learn from it! Worst case if the iGPU is too weak would be for me to take a few PCI lanes from my 970 and try out my old 560 Ti for the host OS - that could be an awful idea, may not even work on my MoBo thinking about it (especially considering Skylake only supports 16 lanes total and 8 lanes may get saturated in heavy gaming, though just under 8GBps bandwidth should probably be fine in most use cases, if not all).

    As far as he NVidia drivers go, I have seen other people trying this out mentioning you can configure the VM to not tell the hardware it's running in a VM. That way NVidia's "bug" where its drivers shut down in a VM can be side-stepped. The worst case if this doesn't pan out is that I have to buy a Win10 OEM disk and go the other way, as you have it set up. Fingers crossed it does pan out, though!
  13. Sevio

    Sevio Back Into Space

    • Member
    Only for 0.1 seconds, but given that I often switch at a moment's notice between a running game and my VM for IRC, IMs or firefox, that would never work for me. I could just find windows alternatives to everything and do everything without a VM, but I like the KDE desktop environment and having access to the GNU tools, as well as being able to port everything except my games over to a new OS or PC without a hitch.
    joppiesaus likes this.
  14. Snipecoolbunny

    Snipecoolbunny Back Into Space

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    i personally think of a raptor drive as an extremely reliable C drive. as its 10000 RPM is the best in the market short of an SSD. and SSD's inherantlyleak info from the way they are made. there are better made ones that resist against that, but they leak easily in comparison to HDD's. i have hard drives that still have info from almost 10 years ago. many of my friends say that they had lost info and alot of files had gone corrupt.
  15. PsychoticLeprechaun

    PsychoticLeprechaun Designer & Web Developer

    • Dev Member
    I couldn't say I'm aware of this being an issue. That said, I only intend for my SSD to be for programs, no data.

    Also, 7200RPM is plenty for me, and reliability is my goal in this particular case - so 5400RPM it is. :)
  16. Snipecoolbunny

    Snipecoolbunny Back Into Space

    • Member
    whatever you want to do. im just giving my opinion. and yea. programs only. maybe in the future you could try out different HDD's. that raptor drive is by far the best drive ive ever had.
  17. PsychoticLeprechaun

    PsychoticLeprechaun Designer & Web Developer

    • Dev Member
    The rig is now set up! I haven't touched the VM idea I've had just yet - will have a go at some point soon. So far just popped Skyrim on via Wine - got a god awful sound quality from it and started playing around with PulseAudio's configuration to see if I could make the game sound a bit better - to only minor success (if anyone has suggestions on other solutions for this, I am all ears!).

    The rig is rather beautiful, and I'm excited to really put it through its paces.

    The pictures of the rig, if people want to check it out, are here. My overall set-up; here.

    The set up was rather interesting, so I'll make a new thread on my journey with Linux.
    joppiesaus likes this.

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